Xana – Disturbing Space

Loughborough Town Centre

Disturbing Space is a radio station and sound system on a custom bicycle which answers to no body, place or time. The bicycle, ‘Soon Reach’, was developed by sound artist Xana in response to a series of build-your-own radio workshops in Loughborough (Charnwood Arts), Leicester and London. The workshops referenced radio’s place in the histories of Black and South Asian communities in Leicester and Loughborough, as well as conversations with Loughborough based academics and locals around themes of connecting through sound, displaced geographies and building free spaces to manifest joy. Disturbing Space reflects on the power of pirate and local radio to connect people through songs, lullabies, rhymes and tales about movement; elevating voices on the periphery and building sounds which burst out and spread from tower blocks, creating a journey that is chosen by the traveller and fuelled by music. ‘Soon Reach’ will be pedalled through Loughborough on 16 June, passers-by are invited to meet with the station and contribute to the broadcast. For details of the exact route please visit the Radar website.

This event is part of (re)composition, a project commissioned by Radar, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University’s Department of Geography. Radar is Loughborough University’s unique contemporary art programme that commissions artists to engage with academic research. For more information on (re)composition and Radar please visit www.arts.lboro.ac.uk/radar.

No booking required.

Making it up: This Moment of June by Rebecca Lee

Music Practice Room, Cope Auditorium, Edward Barnsley Building

Drawing on academic research from across the Social Sciences at Loughborough, Making it up: this moment of June investigates forms and relations of listening that (re)produce and are (re)produced by personal and public places, focusing on the interactions that might support people to perform music but are not in themselves musical. Rebecca has brought together an ensemble of Loughborough musicians to reflect on these ideas and together they will trace boundaries of music, place and registers of listening, exploring how these might be brought within a performance. A public recording session will share the results, which will then re-sound in a playback programme on our Loughborough Campus and in the town over the summer period.

This event is part of (re)composition, a project commissioned by Radar, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University’s Department of Geography. Radar is Loughborough University’s unique contemporary art programme that commissions artists to engage with academic research. For more information on (re)composition and Radar please visit www.arts.lboro.ac.uk/radar.

Please note: if you have access requirements and are planning on attending this event then please contact LU Arts in advance so we can inform of you access arrangements for this room. Email luarts@lboro.ac.uk or telephone 01509 222948.

Book this event

The Mammaries of Tiresias

Wed 6 – Fri 8 June 7.30pm
Tickets £8 / £6 students

Come along and see the final year’s drama assessment piece. A comedic musical piece of theatre that explores gender roles and gender fluidity. With music, movement and bawdy humour, the performance explores a world created that is everywhere and no-where. Can you learn something from a story such as this? Can a woman and a man play alternate roles? Can you forget everything you think you know about the outside world? There’s only one way to find out! Tickets £8 / £6 students

This performance set  either in an imaginary Zanzibar or a no less imaginary Paris is set to challenge your conceptions of the world you think you know. The surrealist play (later adapted into a French Opera) looks at a period in the lives of Tiresias and her Husband, and mockingly questions the gender stereotypes that we hold to be true in the modern world. Through the use of music, movement and bawdy humour we see Tiresias challenge the professions acceptable for a female, and The Husband birth 40,000 children in one day…miraculous, we know. Gender fluidity is explored in a utopia of sorts wherein the audience are taken everywhere and no-where, through all of time, and in no set time at all. It’s a thought provoking piece of theatre, that is sure to make you question the world around you.

Book this event